album art
Novacane Frank Ocean Nostalgia-Ultra 14,262 Plays
confusedcatsagainstfeminism:

I believe in naps.
—
Confused Cats Against Feminism is a project of We Hunted the Mammoth:The New Misogyny, tracked and mocked. You should go there, like right now.

confusedcatsagainstfeminism:

I believe in naps.

Confused Cats Against Feminism is a project of We Hunted the Mammoth:The New Misogyny, tracked and mocked. You should go there, like right now.

fastcodesign:

Can you create that buzzy neighborhood feel in 17.4 million square feet and 28 acres? Manhattan is about to find out.
Read More>

Oh NYC…always more more more.

fastcodesign:

Can you create that buzzy neighborhood feel in 17.4 million square feet and 28 acres? Manhattan is about to find out.

Read More>

Oh NYC…always more more more.

Brothers and sisters, never war, never war! Everything is lost with war, nothing is lost with peace. Never more war.
Did Pope Francis just challenge the Church’s opinion on war? (via positivelypersistentteach)
adteachings:

Check out this new Nike shoebox design from Publicis Impetu in Uruguay. To communicate the flexibility of the new Nike Free, they’ve created a shoebox that’s 1/3 the usual size. It saves cardboard and storage space, and it also serves as a demonstration ad. Awesome.

adteachings:

Check out this new Nike shoebox design from Publicis Impetu in Uruguay. To communicate the flexibility of the new Nike Free, they’ve created a shoebox that’s 1/3 the usual size. It saves cardboard and storage space, and it also serves as a demonstration ad. Awesome.

http://pulitzercenter.tumblr.com/post/92629776439/democracy-and-equal-rights-form-a-natural-pair

pulitzercenter:

image

Democracy and equal rights form a natural pair. And yet India, the world’s greatest stable democracy, measured by a population over 1.2 billion, is sorely lagging in one key aspect: gender equality.

That could start to change in the months and years ahead.

On April 15 this year the Supreme…

fastcompany:

See What I See — African Teenagers Take Their Own Photos To Capture A Different View Of Their Home

No focus on war-torn worlds or endangered wildlife here. Just everyday life, from the viewpoint of 18 Gambian teenagers.

Read More>

You’re probably not getting enough sleep, but you might not be as far off the mark as you think. Most sleep experts would offer that aiming for between seven to nine hours of snooze time a night is optimal for feeling refreshed and productive the next day. In a new report, however … researchers are closing in on what may just be that magic nightly number—and it’s not nine hours, or even eight as once believed… it’s seven hours of sleep.

The usual caveats apply, and these findings should be taken with a grain of salt. But the results are interesting—especially if you’re the kind of person who struggles with sluggishness throughout the day.

"The lowest mortality and morbidity is with seven hours," [says] Shawn Youngstedt, a professor in the College of Nursing and Health Innovation at Arizona State University Phoenix… "Eight hours or more has consistently been shown to be hazardous."

Intriguing new study on the optimal amount of sleep. But that grain of salt can’t be overstated given the wide variation of “chronotypes” and internal time.

Also see the science of what actually happens while you sleep and how it affects your every waking moment.

(via explore-blog)

vicemag:

Two Would-Be Jihadists, Two Very Different Responses from the FBI
One is a 19-year-old citizen from Arvada, Colorado, named Shannon Maureen Conley. The other is a 29-year-old, Pakistani-born permanent US resident who lived in North Carolina named Basit Javed Sheikh. Both—entirely separately—planned to travel to Syria for love and jihad, according to public records, and both came under close scrutiny of the FBI and were eventually arrested.
But in Conley’s case, the FBI gave the would-be jihadist every available out. Overt agents who identified themselves as being from the FBI repeatedly cautioned her against going through with her plans to travel to Syria and join the Islamic State in Iraq and al Sham (ISIS). According to a sworn affidavit, they warned her she would be arrested if she tried to board a plane to the region, but to no avail. Few, if any, targets in federal terrorism investigations have been given such apparently blunt warnings from openly identified agents. “That’s a first as far as I know,” says Trevor Aaronson, author of The Terror Factory: Inside The FBI’s Manufactured War on Terrorism.
Sheikh, however, wasn’t so lucky. The FBI didn’t openly try to talk him out of boarding a plane allegedly to join Jabat al Nusra, the al Qaeda–linked militant group fighting Bashar al Assad’s regime in Syria. Sheikh has even gone so far as to claim that an FBI informant, posing as a nurse in Syria, engaged in a romantic relationship with him, and he was traveling to marry her. An undercover agent—as opposed to an openly identified one, like in Conley’s case—told Sheikh he didn’t have to go through with his plan, something investigators often do to prevent an entrapment defense. Both cases are currently in the pre-trial motions phase.
Continue

vicemag:

Two Would-Be Jihadists, Two Very Different Responses from the FBI

One is a 19-year-old citizen from Arvada, Colorado, named Shannon Maureen Conley. The other is a 29-year-old, Pakistani-born permanent US resident who lived in North Carolina named Basit Javed Sheikh. Both—entirely separately—planned to travel to Syria for love and jihad, according to public records, and both came under close scrutiny of the FBI and were eventually arrested.

But in Conley’s case, the FBI gave the would-be jihadist every available out. Overt agents who identified themselves as being from the FBI repeatedly cautioned her against going through with her plans to travel to Syria and join the Islamic State in Iraq and al Sham (ISIS). According to a sworn affidavit, they warned her she would be arrested if she tried to board a plane to the region, but to no avail. Few, if any, targets in federal terrorism investigations have been given such apparently blunt warnings from openly identified agents. “That’s a first as far as I know,” says Trevor Aaronson, author of The Terror Factory: Inside The FBI’s Manufactured War on Terrorism.

Sheikh, however, wasn’t so lucky. The FBI didn’t openly try to talk him out of boarding a plane allegedly to join Jabat al Nusra, the al Qaeda–linked militant group fighting Bashar al Assad’s regime in Syria. Sheikh has even gone so far as to claim that an FBI informant, posing as a nurse in Syria, engaged in a romantic relationship with him, and he was traveling to marry her. An undercover agent—as opposed to an openly identified one, like in Conley’s case—told Sheikh he didn’t have to go through with his plan, something investigators often do to prevent an entrapment defense. Both cases are currently in the pre-trial motions phase.

Continue